MobiHoc 2004 May 24-26, 2004 Tokyo, Japan sigmobileAssociation forComputing Machinery
The Fifth ACM International Symposium on Mobile Ad Hoc Networking and Computing

Program

[ Tutorials | Technical Presentations | Poster Session ]

TUTORIALS

[ AM T1 | T2 PM T4 | T5 ]

AM

T 1

9:00-13:00

Mori Tower 49F [Conference Room 1]

Title:

Power-Efficient Protocols for Mobile Ad Hoc Networks

Instructors:

SJ Lee, Hewlett Packard Laboratories and Marwan Krunz, University of Arizona

Abstract:

Transmission power control (TPC) has a great potential to achieve high throughput and low energy wireless communications.
This tutorial will begin with a description of the importance of power control in MANETs. We overview the power management in ad hoc networks and point out several deficiencies in the IEEE 802.11 that motivate the need for power control. The tradeoffs in selecting the transmission range are also discussed.

We then introduce a class of energy-oriented power control schemes. We examine the basic idea of TPC and review several power-aware routing (PAR) protocols. The adverse impact of this class of protocols on network throughput is explained.

Next we study TPC schemes that are designed with the goal of increasing network throughput (by increasing spatial reuse). These schemes include a class of algorithms that use TPC primarily to control the topological properties of the network (connectivity, node degree, etc.), and another class of interference-aware TPC schemes that broadcast interference information to bound the power levels of subsequent transmissions. Other protocols that are based on clustering or that combine scheduling and TPC are discussed. The impact of mobility on the design of power controlled MAC protocols is also addressed.

Various complementary approaches and optimizations of TPC are highlighted and discussed, including the use of rate control, directional antennas, and spread spectrum technology. We then survey PSM schemes and outline several directions for future research in this area.

Intended Audience:

This tutorial is intended for researchers and engineers in both industry and academia, as well as for anyone who would like a deeper understanding of energy efficiency and power control in mobile ad hoc networking and the current state of research in this area. The tutorial will provide extended bibliography for those who are interested in an in-depth study of the power control issue in MANETs. People with either CS or EE background will easily follow, and benefit from the tutorial.

Biography:

Marwan M. Krunz is an Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Arizona. His research interests lie in the field of packet networks, especially in its performance and traffic control aspects. His recent work has focused on power-aware routing and MAC protocols for ad hoc networks, the provisioning of quality of service (QoS) over wireless links, QoS routing (path selection, state aggregation), traffic modeling (video, WWW), bandwidth allocation, and video-on-demand systems. He has published more than 60 journal articles and refereed conference papers in these areas.
See http://www.ece.arizona.edu/~krunz for further details.

Sung-Ju Lee is a research scientist at the Mobile & Media Systems Lab (MMSL) of HP Labs. S.-J. received his Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of California, Los Angeles. His Ph.D. dissertation was in routing and multicasting strategies in mobile ad hoc wireless networks.
S.-J. published over thirty five papers in the field of mobile networking and ad hoc networks. He is an area editor (ad hoc networks) for ACM SIGMOBILE’s Mobile Computing & Communications Review (MC2R) and serves on the editorial board of Elsevier Science's Ad Hoc Networks Journal. His research interests include mobile networking & computing, ad hoc networks, energy efficient protocols, streaming media distribution networks, public WLAN Hotspot networks, overlay networks, and adaptive service infrastructure.
See http://www.hpl.hp.com/personal/Sung-Ju_Lee for further details.


T 2

9:00-13:00

Mori Tower 49F [Collaboration Room 1]

Title:

Topology Control in Wireless Ad Hoc Networks

Instructor:

Paolo Santi, Dept. of Computer Science, IIT-CNR, Italy

Abstract:

The topology control problem in wireless ad hoc networks is to choose the transmit power of each node in such a way that energy consumptionis reduced and some property of the communication graph (typically, connectivity) is maintained. Besides reducing energy consumption, topology control increases the capacity of the network, due to reduced contention to access the wireless channel. In fact, it is known that itis more convenient, from the network capacity point of view, to send packets along several short hops rather than using long hops. Given the limited availability of both energy and capacity in ad hoc networks, and especially in wireless sensor networks, topology control is thus considered as a major building block of forthcoming wireless networks.
This tutorial has three major goals:

  • to give the attendees an organic view of the considerable body of literature devoted to topology control in ad hoc networks.

  • to provide the attendees with a "topology control toolkit", i.e., with the expertise needed in the design and analysis of effectivetopology control mechanisms. The theoretical tools that compose thistoolkit are derived from the theories of applied probability,computational geometry, and distributed systems; furthermore, we will discuss in details the requirements that any topology control protocol should meet to be implementable in a real ad hoc network.

  • to outline the limitations of current approaches, paying particular attention to those factors that hamper the application of topology control techniques in a realistic scenario.

This way, we will disclose several directions of further research in the field.Intended

Audience:

The tutorial will address both theoretical and technological aspectsrelated to topology control. For this reason, we believe this tutorial is appealing for reaserchers with both a computer science or engineering background, as well as for people from the industrial community. Graduate and undergraduate students, and any professional who is interested in entering into this fundamental field of ad hoc networking research, are especially welcome.

Biography:

Dr. Santi received the MS degree and the PhD in Computer Science from the University of Pisa, Italy, in 1994 and 2000, respectively. Duringthe PhD, his research interest focused on fault-tolerant computing. Starting from the end of 2000, Dr. Santi's interests shifted to wireless ad hoc networks, first from a dependable computing point of view. The interest grew wider during the six months (January-June 2001) visit at the School of Elec. and Comp.Eng., Georgia Institute of Technology. On Sept. 2001, Dr. Santi joined the Italian National Research Council in Pisa. Since then, his research interests broadened, including also more theoretical topics, such as combinatorial auctions. Currently, Dr. Santi is visiting the Dept. of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University.

Dr. Santi is a member of ACM and SIGMOBILE.

[ AM T1 | T2 PM T4 | T5 ]

PM

T 4

14:00-18:00

Mori Tower 49F [Conference Room 1+2]

Title:

Efficient Architectures for Information Transport in Wireless Sensor Networks

Instructor:

Sergio Servietto, Cornell University

Abstract:

What makes a network architecture efficient? What are good/bad design choices? And how do we measure efficiency to start with anyway? This tutorial is concerned with the study of architectural issues in the design and performance analysis of one type of wireless networks, from the point of view of how efficiently these networks can support information transfer. The networks of interest, ubiquitous in the real world, are modeled using tools from the theory of flow networks and from network information theory. These tools will be introduced with simple and intuitive examples (as opposed to long proofs and derivations), all derived from one concrete application. And a number of new protocol design problems will be formulated.

Intended Audience:

This tutorial is aimed at anyone with an elementary education in discrete mathematics (at the level of a sophomore-level course), with a desire to obtain a strong intuitive understanding on networking topics often found in advanced textbooks and/or research papers only. As such, it is a good match for researchers (particularly graduate students), technical managers and engineers, with interests in performance analysis issues in the general area of networked communication systems.

Biography:

Sergio D. Servetto
Assistant Professor, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Cornell University. Since Fall 2001.
Courses taught at Cornell http://cn.ece.cornell.edu/teaching/
Further detail avaiable at http://people.ece.cornell.edu/servetto/


T 5

14:00-18:00

Mori Tower 49F [Sky Studio]

Title:

Japanese Language Introductory Tutorial - MANET Overview

Instructors:

 

Abstract:

This tutorial will be conducted in Japanese.
Tutorial Outline in Japanese

[ AM T1 | T2 PM T4 | T5 ]

 

Last modified 21-May-2004